Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Auto Repair Shop

6557 Walzem Road San Antonio, Texas 78239 Call 210-239-1600
 
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Manual Transmission Frequently Asked Questions


San Antonio Transmission Expert Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop In San Antonio Offers Free Towing w/ Transmission Repairs*, Free Manual Transmission Performance Check, Rebuilt Transmissions, Used Transmissions, New Transmissions, Transmission San Antonio

1.

What Are Normal Driving Conditions For A Manual Transmission?

Automobiles that are usually driven occasionally or for short distance trips are often subjected to unusual wear and strain to the manual transmission. Not only do driving conditions affect the manual transmission but the clutch, clutch cable, clutch slave cylinder, clutch master cylinder, flywheel, brakes, engine, etc.

Cars and trucks that are consistently driven short distances never have the opportunity for the engine to warm up to normal operating temperature. This can cause excessive wear on the engine. Low mileage manual transmissions subjected to city driving or stop and go driving usually experience far more wear than manual transmissions with the same number of highway miles. The highway mileage doesn’t create as much wear and tear on the manual transmission. Highway miles are easier on the transmission as the number of times the manual transmission shifts up and down through its gears is far less then stop and go driving.

Some other seemingly normal driving conditions can affect the manual transmissions life span. Conditions such as extreme hot or cold temperatures, snowy roads, icy roads, mountainous terrain, dusty terrain and poor air quality can drastically affect the life of the manual transmission. Under normal driving conditions, automobile manufacturers recommend servicing the transmission fluid as seldom as every 20,000 to 100,000 miles. But the question is what constitutes normal driving conditions?

According to most automobile manufactures normal driving conditions of manual transmissions can range, but most agree that the following conditions are considered normal. Driving about 12,000 to 15,000 miles per year. Keeping the engine and transmission operating at normal operating temperature most of the time. A driving mix of about 1/3 city driving and 2/3 highway driving. Outside temperature usually moderate; not too hot or too cold. Roadways dry, straight, occasional, moderate hills or valleys. Air quality moderate and clean. No excessive speeding, drag racing, jackrabbit starts, hard braking or quick shifting. Light to moderate loads; one or two passengers, with very little weight added to the trunk or cargo space. Tire pressures set properly and all fluids at correct levels and condition.

If you operate your automobile under more extreme driving conditions as most people do you’ll want to reduce the time and mileage between transmission fluid change maintenance services. Having your manual transmission serviced once a year, or at very least every other year, seems to be the consensus among transmission repair professionals. If you’re not sure when the last time your manual transmission fluid was changed, just bring your car or truck into Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop for a Free Manual Transmission Fluid Evaluation and FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check.

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2.

What Winter Hazards Affect My Manual Transmission?

Winter conditions vary geographically, but there are a few conditions that are common to most of the United States during the winter months. How you deal with those winter conditions can have a dramatic effect on your manual transmission. Cold temperatures means cold weather and as temperatures drop, manual transmission fluid thickens reducing their ability to lubricate.

If the temperature tends to get really cold in your area, invest in an engine heater that plugs into a wall outlet and warms the engine before you come out in the morning. A timer will allow you to start the engine warming a few hours before you’re ready to leave and saving you money. For much of the country driving on snow and ice is part of a normal winter.

But there are specific hazards to your manual transmission on those roadways. One that you may not be familiar with is what can happen if you get stuck. Too often drivers spin their wheels in the hopes of freeing themselves from a snow drift or icy patch. This can cause major damage to the manual transmission. Today’s automobile uses a computer to control vehicle operation. When you spin the wheels the computer sees the vehicle speed rising; in many cases it has no way of knowing that you aren’t really moving. If the wheels regain traction, their speed will drop suddenly. The result can be catastrophic to the manual transmission. The best way to get out of a drift or icy patch is to rock the car back and forth, forward and reverse until you can get moving again. Or, better yet, get someone to push or pull you out of the snow. Avoid spinning the wheels, or you could end up damaging the manual transmission.

No major component of your vehicle can survive indefinitely with water in its internal components. But no other component can be damaged as quickly as your manual transmission can by water. Even a small amount of water in an manual transmission almost always results in serious failure and major repair bills. The reason is the clutch linings are hygroscopic; that is, they absorb water, even if they have to push transmission fluid out of the linings to do it. This water quickly finds its way down to the metal backings, causing them to rust and lift the linings off of the clutches. The result is metal to metal contact, which always means serious damage to the transmission. To avoid this type of trouble, steer clear of deep puddles. Should you find your automobile submerged, don’t start the engine. Your only chance of avoiding a big repair bill is to have your automobile towed into a transmission repair shop and have all the manual transmission drained out. If you're lucky, draining and servicing the transmission fluid may be all that’s necessary to save it. If not, your auto insurance may cover part or all of the damage. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission & Automotive will be happy to supply the necessary technical information to your insurance company. So whether it’s snow and ice, water, or just plain cold out, winter delivers a whole new set of conditions just waiting to damage your manual transmission.

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3.

How Do I Check The Manual Transmission Fluid Level?

Manual transmissions operate on oil, properly called manual transmission fluid. Low manual transmission fluid levels can have a disastrous effect on the manual transmission operation. In recent years many automobile manufacturers have started to eliminate the manual transmission oil dipstick. These transmissions are called sealed units. Manual transmissions that are considered sealed units require a much more involved process to check the transmission oil level. This puts checking the manual transmission oil level beyond the capabilities of the average car driver. If your car or truck manual transmission doesn’t have a dipstick or drain plug level reader, you should bring your vehicle by Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop for a FREE Manual Transmission Fluid Level Check.

The best time to have the manual transmission oil level checked is at every motor oil change. However if your vehicle doesn’t have a manual transmission dipstick, you should at least check the transmission oil level every other motor oil change. The vehicles owners manual should provide a detailed procedure for checking the manual transmission oil level. Always use the recommended manual transmission oil by the manufacturer. If the transmission requires more than a quart of oil or is using transmission oil regularly, take your vehicle in to have the transmission checked for oil leaks.

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4.

What Type of Shop Should I Have Change My Manual Transmission Fluid?

When it comes to manual transmission fluid maintenance the market is saturated with competition from lube shops, automotive shops, transmission shops and dealerships. No matter where you look someone is offering some type of transmission fluid change, fluid flush or oil change special. Many non transmission shops offer cheap transmission fluid changes and fluid flushes. Often times much cheaper then most professional transmission repair shops.

Is there really a difference between a lube shop and a transmission repair shop? Yes there several difference such as most lube mechanics are not trained or experienced in manual transmissions. Most lube mechanics only know how to drain and fill oil. But chances are he won’t be able to identify and take care of any manual transmission problems. A benefit of having a manual transmission fluid change is to check the overall operation of the transmission. Having a manual transmission fluid change is a perfect time to check for transmission oil leaks and adjustments needed. By checking for transmission leaks and adjustments can prevent costly transmission repairs down the road. By taking your car or truck to a professional manual transmission shop with experienced transmission mechanics is key. An experienced manual transmission mechanic knows how to identify and fix transmission problems before they get worse. A professional transmission repair shop offering transmission maintenance services often road test the vehicle and perform an under the vehicle inspection.

Beware of cheap transmission fluid services! There a few shops that advertise $8.99 transmission fluid change service. Really $8.99 sounds like a great price, but consideration the fact the new O.E.M. transmission fluid cost are constantly raising. The average cost of a low grade transmission fluid is $2.99 a quart. A basic transmission fluid drain and fill will require at least 5 to 6 quarts of new transmission fluid. So 6 quarts of new transmission fluid x $2.99 a quart = $17.64 cost not to mention labor. The average transmission fluid change service takes between 45 minutes to an hour to properly complete. The transmission industry standard of labor per hour is $75.00. So a basic transmission fluid change cost on average $17.64 in fluid and $75.00 for labor. The total equals $92.64. Yes many repair shops discount the labor involved to attract new customers. But how do you offer a transmission fluid change service for under $20.00. What type of transmission fluid is being used? Who is performing the service? What’s the catch? Why so cheap?

Today’s manual transmissions require very specific fluid to operate properly and efficiently. Using the wrong transmission fluid could destroy your manual transmission in just a few miles. Many drivers believe that a transmission fluid change is a simple and quick service like most oil changes. Often times changing the manual transmission fluid requires more knowledge and experience than most lube mechanics have. There are thousands cases nationwide where internal transmission damage occurred because of an improper transmission fluid change. Is a cheap transmission fluid change really worth saving a few dollars? 

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5.

How Do I Avoid Costly Manual Transmission Repairs?

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop Top 10 List Of Do's And Don'ts To Help You Avoid Costly Manual Transmission Repairs

1. Do scheduled regular manual transmission oil change maintenance according to your automobile owner's manual.

2. Do have your manual transmission oil checked every time you change the motor oil.

3. Do make sure you come to a complete stop before moving transmission shifter into another gear.

4. Don’t drive on spare tires or mismatched tire sizes with front wheel or all wheel drive vehicles for extended periods of time, as this will damage the transmission.

5. Don’t drive a car or truck with low transmission oil or no transmission oil.

6. Don’t change transmission gear ranges from drive to reverse when your automobile is moving.

7. Don’t spin your tires on turns with front wheel drive cars or trucks.

8. Don’t drive your automobile when you are having any transmission problems. This may cause further and unnecessary damage to the transmission.

9. Don’t drag race your car or truck unless your automobile has been upgraded as it puts unnecessary strain on your transmission.

10. Don’t drive in 4x4 range on dry pavement unless automobile is all wheel drive or automatic 4x4.

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6.

Do Manual Transmission Fluid Additives Really Work?

Any auto parts store will have an isle dedicated to transmission fluid additives and transmission fix in a can you can imagine. These products have labels that offer promises from simply making your transmission last longer, stop leak and all the way up to a transmission rebuild in a can. Many of these products don’t work. So do not waste your money on transmission fluid additives and transmission fix in a can that claim to offer a “new transmission in a can.” Check with Sergeant Clutch for information on transmission fluid additives that really work as advertised.

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7.

Will Servicing My Manual Transmission Help It Last Longer?

Yes servicing your car or trucks manual transmission regularly can dramatically extend its life and enhance it performance. That’s because the manual transmission fluid does more than just lubricate and cool the internal transmission parts: It also helps drive it. Damage to the manual transmission fluid, such as oxidation and shear, will reduce the transmissions holding power and life. Old worn out transmission fluid allows the manual transmission to slip, overheat and can quickly cause it to fail. To keep your manual transmission working longer, you should have it serviced regularly. Regular manual transmission fluid services will add miles and years to your transmission’s life.

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8.

Did You Know Changing Your Manual Transmission Oil Saves You Time & Money?

Today’s manual transmission oil is much more complex and high tech. Manual transmission oil is more than just a lubricate. Transmission oil helps the manual transmission move and operate properly. Any wear or damage to the manual transmission oil, such as oxidation will reduce the transmissions holding power, creating transmission shifting problems, transmission overheating, and internal transmission part failure. By regularly changing the manual transmission oil in you car or truck will dramatically extend the life of your manual transmission. A simple transmission oil change annually can add many years to the life of your car or trucks transmission. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers several transmission preventive maintenance services. 

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9.

Why Is My Manual Transmission Making Noise?

Noises in your manual transmission can be caused by several things. The transmission noise could be something inside the transmission, or it could be something outside the transmission. Manual transmission noises should be checked as soon as possible. Properly operating manual transmissions do not make any noises. A noise inside the transmission could indicate a problem. By identifying the transmission problem early could help prevent costly damage to your manual transmission. Call the manual transmission specialist in San Antonio Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop today. Our professional transmission mechanic will perform our exclusive Manual Transmission Performance Check for FREE and get to the root of any potential transmission problem you may be experiencing. Back To Manual Transmission FAQs Click Here      


10.

What Should I Do My Vehicle Won't Move?

If your vehicle won't move, call Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop. We offer FREE Towing Service with major transmission repair and clutch repair. Once your vehicle has been towed to our repair shop, a trained mechanic will perform a FREE Transmission Performance Check and find out exactly why your vehicle isn't moving. Once the Performance Check is complete, you'll have the information you need to make the next step to get your vehicle back out on the road and you'll have the confidence of being with a repair shop that can solve any of your transmission problems or concerns.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a FREE Transmission Performance Check. What is a Transmission Performance Check? This comprehensive set of diagnostic test help determine transmission problems. Our trained and professional transmission mechanic will be able to tell you precisely whether you’re dealing with a transmission problem or not after completing the FREE Transmission Performance Check. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop will be able to let you know what it’ll take to fix your car or truck. Fact the vast majority of customers who bring their automobile in with transmission problems don’t actually need their transmissions rebuilt. In most cases the transmission problem turns out to be an external problem, which usually costs far less than a transmission rebuild or new transmission. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio will get you back on the road faster and cheaper and put it back into proper running condition.

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11.

My Vehicle Won't Go Into Gear Why?

If your car or trucks manual transmission won't go into gear is a symptom that you are experiencing a transmission problem. This is something that needs to be checked by a trained manual transmission mechanic. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio offers a FREE Transmission Performance Check that will identify why your vehicle isn't going into gear. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers FREE Towing Service with major transmission repairs. Call us today and schedule your FREE Transmission Performance Check. We are located at 6557 Walzem Road in San Antonio, Texas 78239.

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12.

What Is A Sergeant Clutch Free Manual Transmission Performance Check?

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a comprehensive FREE Transmission Performance Check which is a series of test. This Computer Diagnostic Service utilizes state-of-the art diagnostic equipment, which is connected to your automobile to view computer trouble codes. Sergeant Clutch trained transmission mechanic utilizes the same procedures the dealerships perform by retrieving information directly from the automobile's data stream to accurately pinpoint automobile system failure(s) or service(s) needed. The Computer Diagnostic Service provides you with an accurate assessment of your automobile's condition including the manual transmission. After the automobile computer data is retrieved our mechanic can provide an accurate recommendation to get you back on the road quickly and efficiently. This comprehensive transmission performance check provides a complete diagnosis of your automobile’s transmission performance and general operation.

With our step by step manual transmission diagnostic service, our transmission mechanic will find what transmission problem(s) you have. The Manual Transmission Performance Check consists of a compressive transmission fluid check, road test, under car inspection and computer diagnostic scan. The manual transmission fluid check is generally the first indicator of possible transmission problems. Under close observation the transmission fluid and smell can indicate transmission wear and damage. If there is an unpleasant odor or discoloration in combination with other symptoms the transmission may require further diagnostics and a possible internal transmission inspection.

The road test is made up of a stationary test and a driving test. During these two tests, the manual transmission is checked for initial engagements, slipping, vibrations, noises, harsh shifting, soft shifting, erratic shifting, late shifting, early shift patterns, passing gear, clutch engagement. Our transmission mechanic will perform an under the automobile inspection to help determine what type of adjustment(s), repair(s) or replacement(s) may be needed.

When the results of your manual transmission performance check show that there is an internal problem with your transmission, we recommend further investigation with an internal inspection of your manual transmission. This internal transmission inspection consists of the removal of your manual transmission and disassembly of the unit in order to view all internal transmission parts. During this transmission inspection, all parts will be examined for wear and damage. When the internal transmission inspection is completed, our Service Manager will provide you with a full report of those transmission items that are in need of either repair, replacement, or upgrade along with an estimate for those transmission repair services. 

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13.

5 Recommendations After A Manual Transmission Performance Check

1. No transmission problem is found. The Manual Transmission Performance Check indicated at this time no transmission maintenance, repair or adjustment is needed.

2. Preventive Maintenance Service. This service helps to prevent transmission trouble before it starts. Our transmission mechanic will replace your vehicle's manual transmission oil.

3. External Adjustment / Repair. This service includes any repairs to the exterior of the transmission that does not involve the removal of the transmission.

4. Transmission Reseal Service. This requires the removal of the manual transmission to replace all leaking external seals in your vehicle's transmission. We perform this service after inspection of the transmission. It is designed to repair leaking transmissions, which have no other internal problems.

5. Internal Transmission Inspection Service. Our transmission mechanic will completely and thoroughly evaluate all internal components of your vehicle's transmission. We perform this service if the Performance Check indicates you have an internal transmission problem. We remove the transmission, disassemble and check all internal parts of the transmission for wear and tear. Our mechanic upon your approval will replace only those necessary parts with parts meeting OEM specifications to give your transmission the ability to obtain optimal performance. Finally, after any work is completed the transmission is reinstalled into the vehicle.

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14.

How Do I Check A Manual Transmission And Clutch?

In order to proper check a manual transmission / gearbox and clutch you need to understand the basics. The manual transmission / gearbox uses a driver operated hydraulic clutch or cable clutch operated by a clutch pedal assembly and transmission gear shifter. The manual transmission / gearbox has become an increasingly complex transmission over the years. The manual transmission / gearbox of the past were 2 speed transmissions or 3 speed transmissions. Today’s passenger manual transmission / gearbox have 4 speed transmissions, 5 speed transmissions, 6 speed transmissions up to 8 speed transmissions. The manual transmission / gearbox use a clutch system which transfers torque between the engine and transmission. The clutch is subject to wear and abuse everyday the automobile is driven. An experienced manual transmission driver can help the life span of the clutch. A good clutch when driven correctly can last hundreds of thousands or miles. However a weak clutch, abrupt downshifting, aggressive shifting can lead to more frequent transmission and clutch problems. The manual transmission / gearbox fluid must be changed periodically. The transmission oil used to lubricate the transmission gears tends to break down over time. The manual transmission / gearbox oil use a sulfur bearing anti-wear compounds. These special compounds are used to reduce high sliding friction wear on the manual transmission parts. Check the transmission for oil leaks. Look under the automobile and check transmission for any oil leaks. The manual transmission should be free of any oil leaks.

Manual Transmission & Clutch Test Drive starts with checking the mirrors, the driver's seat, the steering wheel adjustment, etc. Proceed to drive only when you sure it's safe. With caution apply the clutch pedal and shift the manual transmission shifter into neutral gear. Apply the parking brake. With the engine idling, press the clutch pedal all the way, hold it down, and listen for any noises. Then release the clutch pedal and listen for any noises again. There should be no loud noises in either positions. Test drive the automobile at different speeds in all gears going through gears one by one. Every gear should shift smoothly and easily without any grinding noises, jerks or vibrations. While driving in second or third gear, try to press down sharply on the accelerator pedal for an instance. The clutch should not slip. If you feel any slipping (e.g. the engine rpm increases but the speed remains the same), the clutch most likely has to be replaced. Drive the automobile with acceleration and deceleration. There should be no grinding, whining or humming noise under any condition. All the gears should shift easily and noiselessly.

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15.

What’s Wrong With My Manual Transmission?

To find out what‘s wrong with today‘s manual transmission, a certified transmission mechanic will have to perform a series of comprehensive diagnostic tests to determine if the manual transmission problem is inside the transmission or outside. If the transmission problem is inside the transmission it could be caused be normal wear and tear or part failure. If the transmission problem is outside the transmission it could be one of the many parts and components related to the clutch system. The manual transmission of today has a lot more to the transmission operation and performance than the transmission itself.

Fact today’s manual transmissions are controlled by high tech electronic computer systems integrated with the rest of the automobile that many automotive mechanics have a difficult time determining whether a manual transmission problem is inside the transmission or not. So a problem with the engine, brakes, clutch, clutch cable, clutch master cylinder, clutch slave cylinder or flywheel could have a huge effect on a manual transmissions operation and performance.

Only a well trained, experienced manual transmission mechanic can be sure you actually have a transmission problem. A properly trained, experienced and certified manual transmission mechanic examines the manual transmission and clutch. Our mechanic will perform the necessary diagnostic test to determine where and what the problem is.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check. What is a Manual Transmission Performance Check? This comprehensive set of diagnostic test help determine manual transmission problems. Our trained and professional manual transmission mechanic will be able to tell you precisely whether you’re dealing with a transmission problem or not after completing the FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check.

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16.

How Much Will A Manual Transmission Repair Cost?

Manual transmission repair costs depend on first what is wrong with the transmission and second what parts may be required to correct the problem. Overall 60% of all transmission repairs are minor ones that do not require a complete overhaul of the transmission. Minor transmission repairs include clutch related adjustment, transmission fluid change, transmission reseal or replacement of electrical transmission solenoid or sensor. Minor transmission repairs usually start at $49.95 and can range up to a few hundred dollars depending on parts and labor needed to fix the problem(s). Major transmission repairs usually start at $695.00 for a basic transmission overhaul and over $2,000.00 for extensive transmission hard part damage. A reman transmission or new transmission can have a price tag of $1,800.00 to over $3,500.00 depending on year, make and model. Today's manual transmissions are high tech, computerized and sophisticated. In order to determine what the transmission problem is and how much will it cost, requires extensive testing to determine the reason for failure. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check. This comprehensive set of diagnostic test help determine transmission problems. Our trained and professional manual transmission mechanic will be able to tell you precisely whether you’re dealing with a transmission problem or not after completing the FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check. Sergeant Clutch will be able to let you know what it’ll take to fix your car or truck

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17.

Why Does It Cost So Much To Have A Manual Transmission Repaired or Rebuilt?

It really doesn’t. At least, it doesn’t when you understand what is required to repair, overhaul, or rebuild your manual transmission. Repairing or rebuilding a manual transmission is not as simple as changing spark plugs or adjusting the carburetor. Today’s manual transmission particularly those with front wheel drive or all wheel drive systems are extremely complicated transmissions. The transmission parts for some late model imports can cost ten times as much as parts for older, larger domestic automobiles. Just getting to the transmission parts you need to inspect in order to find out what’s wrong with the transmission often requires major surgery especially on smaller cars where the manufacturer has tightly packed different parts and mechanical systems on top of and around each other.

During a major transmission repair or rebuild, the entire manual transmission assembly is removed for the automobile. Then the manual transmission is dismantled and the internal transmission parts are cleaned off. Next the transmission parts are carefully inspected for parts tolerance, worn parts or damaged parts. A transmission parts list is then created from the parts required to correctly repair, overhaul or rebuild transmission. Upon customer approval the transmission is then deep cleaned and prepared to reinstallation of transmission parts. Each transmission part is assembled together into one of many subassemblies in the transmission. Each subassembly must be properly adjusted and tested for proper operation. Then the subassemblies must be assembled into the transmission case. Once in the case the adjustment and testing procedure begins all over again. Once the transmission is completely assembled, its ready to be reinstalled in the automobile. After the mechanic installs the transmission its time for and test drive. As you can see there is huge amount of time, skill and labor involved with a manual transmission repair or transmission rebuild. With such complex transmissions, preventive maintenance such as a transmission fluid change are the key to keeping transmission repair costs down. To help head off major transmission problems, Sergeant Clutch recommends having your transmission serviced at least every 12,000 miles or once a year.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check. This comprehensive set of diagnostic test help determine transmission problems. Our trained and professional manual transmission mechanic will be able to tell you precisely whether you’re dealing with a transmission problem or not after completing the FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop will be able to let you know what it’ll take to fix your car or truck. Fact the vast majority of customers who bring their automobile in with transmission problems don’t actually need their transmissions rebuilt. In most cases the transmission problem turns out to be an external problem, which usually costs far less than a transmission rebuild or new transmission. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio will get you back on the road faster and cheaper and put it back into proper running condition.

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18.

Why Can't You Tell Me Exactly The Cost To Fix My Manual Transmission Without Dismantling It?

You’d be amazed at how many customers want us to diagnose their manual transmission problems over the phone. Aside from the fact that a customer might easily miss a symptom a trained mechanic would see or hear when the vehicle is brought in, can you tell the difference between a rattle, buzz, grind, whine and a slip? And do you mean the same thing by those words as we do?

Twenty plus years ago the transmission industry was very basic. Back then there were only a dozen different manual transmissions on the road. Most every transmission repair shop had a good stock of rebuilt manual transmission units on hand. There were almost no transmission updates necessary and even if some usual part failed most transmission shops had a good supply of used and new transmission parts on hand to replace it. In today’s transmission market there are more than a hundred manual transmissions in use and new transmissions showing up all the time. Many of those transmissions have several different gear variations or calibrations, with as many as a dozen modifications necessary. To provide you with an accurate cost estimate of your manual transmission’s condition. Our manual transmission mechanic must perform a series of rigorous tests. The mechanic must identify which manual transmission is in your automobile and which version of that transmission it is. Then they have to identify the specific transmission problem and isolate whether it’s in the transmission or the clutch system. Finally, they have to determine the likely causes for the problem, based on a logical diagnostic process. Once the mechanic has that information, our Service Manager is able to give you an accurate explanation of your transmissions condition.

The plain truth is we simply can’t be sure of what’s wrong with your manual transmission until we take a look inside. Nobody can. Transmission problems and symptoms can be observed externally like noises, leaks or vibrations. These symptoms can signal a wide range of possible problems, not necessarily a single problem or malfunction. Also, many problems that can occur with today’s transmissions maybe caused by a component outside the transmission like a clutch related adjustment.

We’ve got to give your transmission a thorough checkup to really now what’s causing the transmission problem. If anyone ever tells you they can accurately diagnose what’s wrong with your manual transmission without a thorough diagnosis (which may include looking inside), you’d better get a second opinion.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a FREE Transmission Performance Check. This comprehensive set of diagnostic test help determine transmission problems. Our trained and professional transmission mechanic will be able to tell you precisely whether you’re dealing with a transmission problem or not after completing the FREE Transmission Performance Check.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop will be able to let you know what it’ll take to fix your car or truck. Fact the vast majority of customers who bring their automobile in with transmission problems don’t actually need their transmissions rebuilt. In most cases the transmission problem turns out to be an external problem, which usually costs far less than a transmission rebuild or new transmission. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair shop in San Antonio will get you back on the road faster and cheaper and put it back into proper running condition.

San Antonio Transmission Expert Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop In San Antonio Offers Free Towing w/ Transmission Repairs*, Free Manual Transmission Performance Check, Rebuilt Transmissions, Used Transmissions, New Transmissions, Transmission San Antonio


19.

What Is A Reman / Remanufactured Manual Transmission?

A reman / remanufactured transmission is generally a transmission that has been completely reconditioned on a mass assembly line process as opposed to a custom rebuild process. The quality of remanufactured transmissions vary greatly depending on which company remanufactured the transmission and the remanufactures set of rebuild standards.

The big decision of whether or not to use a remanufactured transmission or a custom rebuilt transmission has many variables. How do you use your vehicle? Is the transmission in your vehicle a problematic transmission or a more simple type transmission? How long do you plan to keep the vehicle? Is your vehicle subjected to any special driving conditions such as extreme hot or cold weather, unusual mountainous terrain, city use or towing?

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop currently offers several Transmission Warranty options. We provide transmission repair customers Sergeant Clutch's Standard 12 month / 12,000 mile worry free warranty protection on all qualifying transmission parts and labor. We also offer a 90 day / 4,000 mile parts and labor warranty, 24 month / 24,000 mile parts and labor warranty, 36 month / 36,000 mile parts and labor warranty and a 36 month / 50,000 mile parts & labor warranty ask for more details.

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20.

Will You Be Installing All New Parts In My Rebuilt Manual Transmission?

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio uses both new and remanufactured parts where required and rebuilds all transmission back to OEM factory standards and specifications. When it comes to automotive repair, clutch repair and transmission repair San Antonio drivers turn to Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop “The Transmission Specialist” with confidence. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio is ready to serve drivers with transmission problems, clutch problems and automotive problems.

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21.

What Should I Look for in a Manual Transmission Warranty?

Today’s transmission rebuild and repair service is a big investment. When you spend hundreds or even thousands of dollars repairing your manual transmission. You want some kind of assurance that your manual transmission will keep working for a while and if in the event there is a problem what happens. You want a transmission warranty.

What should you look for in a transmission warranty? The transmission warranty should be written in simple and easy to read and understand language. The transmission warranty should identify the automobile and its owner. The transmission warranty should identify the beginning date and mileage of coverage. It should list the warranty duration in time and mileage. The transmission warranty should identify exactly what’s covered and what’s not covered. The transmission warranty should spell out exactly what the consumer must do to receive repairs under the terms of the warranty.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair shop in San Antonio currently offers several Transmission Warranties. Sergeant Clutch provides transmission repair customers with worry-free protection on qualifying transmission parts and labor. Our transmission warranties range from 90 days / 4,000 mile, 6 month / 6,000 mile, 12 month / 12,000, 24 month / 24,000 mile, 36 month / 36,000 mile and 36 month / 50,000 mile parts & labor warranty ask for more details.

 

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22.

Top 6 Tips How To Avoid Transmission Scams and Transmission Rip-Offs

Having a manual transmission and clutch problem can be very timely and expensive auto repair. The manual transmission and clutch system have become much more complex, computerized and expensive. These new designs have made the manual transmission and clutch more reliable these days, but still manual transmissions do tend to wear out and break down. Some manual transmission rebuilds can easily cost $2,000.00 or more.

1. The most important information you need to know is the year, make, model, engine size, and in some cases the VIN# of the automobile with problems. In order to get accurate information and estimates you got to have this information

2. When describing the manual transmission problems you are experiencing be as descriptive as possible. When does the problem happen and how often. When was the first time you noticed the problem(s).Mention if any indicator lights are on such as Check Engine Light, Service Engine Light Soon Light, etc.

3. Always get recommendations of friends, family and co-workers to recommend a local transmission repair shop where they were treated fair and were happy with the transmission repairs and services.

4. Always look for a professional auto repair shop appearance. A transmission repair shop that is clean, organized and busy indicates a professional business attitude and work environment.

5. Always avoid telephone cost estimates for transmission repairs. Today’s automobiles make it virtually impossible for anyone to give an accurate transmission repair cost estimate over the telephone. Any transmission repair shop / auto repair shop that gives you an exact cost estimate for major transmission repairs before they physically check the car / truck are probably giving you a “low ball” transmission cost repair estimate. To get an accurate cost estimate for transmission repairs requires a series of transmission check procedures.

6. Always ask for a detailed written cost estimate for any transmission repairs, service or recommendations. After a complete transmission performance check of your car / truck the transmission repair shop should have a fairly good idea of what’s wrong with your car / truck transmission. The transmission repair shop or auto repair shop should be able to provide you a written cost repair estimate of any needed or recommended transmission repairs or service(s). The written cost repair estimate should have a detailed deception of what’s wrong with the transmission. The written cost repair estimate should also include the warranty and complete cost of all repairs and services.

Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio provides quality rebuilt transmissions, transmission repairs and transmission fluid change services at a fair price. When it comes to transmission problems, clutch problems, automotive problems, check engine light San Antonio drivers turn to Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop. 

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23.

What Is A Manual Transmission & Gearbox?

The manual transmission is known by a few names such as manual, manual gearbox, standard transmission, straight shift, stick shift or straight drive. The manual transmission uses a driver operated hydraulic clutch or cable clutch operated by a clutch pedal assembly and transmission shifter. The manual transmission is characterized by transmission gear ratios such as 2 speed manual transmission, 3 speed manual transmission, 4 speed manual transmission, 5 speed manual transmission and 6 speed manual transmission. Some heavy duty truck manual transmission / gearbox can have many more transmission gears. Modern day car and truck manual transmissions typically use a 4 speed transmission, 5 speed transmission or 6 speed transmission all include reverse gear.

The inside of a manual transmission / gearbox. The manual transmission / gearbox has several transmission shafts with various transmission gears and other transmission parts. Most rear wheel drive manual transmissions have 3 transmission shafts. The transmission input shaft, transmission countershaft, and transmission output shaft. The transmission countershaft is also known as the transmission layshaft. In cars and trucks with rear wheel drive manual transmissions, the transmission input shaft and transmission output shaft lie along the same line, and many times combined into a single shaft within the transmission. The single transmission shaft is called the transmission mainshaft. Sometimes the term transmission mainshaft refers to just the transmission input shaft or just the transmission output shaft, rather than the entire assembly. Most front wheel drive cars and trucks with manual transmissions have a transverse engine. The front wheel drive manual transmission has an integral final drive, differential, usually only have 2 transmission shafts. The transmission input shaft and transmission countershaft. The transmission input shaft runs the whole length of the transmission gearbox. The front wheel drive manual transmission and rear wheel drive manual transmission operate very similarly. When the transmission is in neutral, and the clutch is disengaged, the transmission input shaft, clutch disk and transmission countershaft can continue to rotate under their own inertia. The engine, the transmission input shaft, clutch and transmission output shaft all rotate independently.

The manual transmission / gearbox has become an increasingly complex transmission. The manual transmission / gearbox of the past was 2 or 3 speeds and no synchromesh in low gear. The manual 4 speed transmission and 5 speed manual transmission were non synchronized transmissions used only in trucks. Today's manual 4 speed transmission, manual 5 speed transmission, manual 6 speed transmission and manual transaxle transmission are much quieter, smoother and more efficient. However the new design manual 4 speed transmission, 5 speed transmission, 6 speed transmission and manual transmission are much more complex and high tech.

The benefits of manual transmissions are better fuel economy than automatic transmissions. Increased fuel economy with a properly operating manual transmission / gearbox automobile versus an equivalent automatic transmission automobile can range from 5% to about 15% depending on driving conditions and driving style. Manual transmissions / gearbox do not require active cooling and weigh less than comparable automatic transmissions.

Manual transmissions / gearbox require less maintenance and tend to be easier to repair due to the fact that they have fewer moving transmission parts and are, mechanically, much simpler than automatic transmissions. When properly operated by an experienced driver, manual transmissions / gearbox tend to last longer than similar automatic transmissions.

Manual transmissions / gearbox use a clutch system which transfers torque between the engine and transmission. The clutch is subject to wear and abuse everyday the car or truck is driven. An experienced standard transmission driver can help the life span of the clutch. A good clutch when driven correctly can last hundreds of thousands or miles. However a weak clutch, abrupt downshifting, aggressive shifting can lead to more frequent transmission and clutch problems.

The manual transmission fluid must be changed periodically. The transmission fluid used to lubricate the transmission gears tends to break down over time. The manual transmission fluid / gear oil use a sulfur bearing anti-wear compounds. These special compounds are used to reduce high sliding friction wear on the transmission parts.

The Transmission & Clutch Repair Specialist in San Antonio Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop has the answers to all your manual transmission repair problems, gearbox problems and clutch problems. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop offers a FREE Manual Transmission Performance Check and FREE Clutch Performance Check.

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24.

What Is An Unsynchronized Manual Transmission?

The earliest form of a manual transmission is thought to have been invented by Louis-René Panhard and Emile Levassor in the late 19th century. This type of transmission offered multiple gear ratios and, in most cases, reverse. The gears were typically engaged by sliding them on their shafts hence the phrase shifting gears, which required a lot of careful timing and throttle manipulation when shifting, so that the gears would be spinning at roughly the same speed when engaged; otherwise, the teeth would refuse to mesh. These transmissions are called sliding mesh transmissions and sometimes called a crash box, because of the difficulty in changing gears and the loud grinding sound that often accompanied. Newer manual transmissions on cars, instead have all gears mesh at all times; these are referred to as constant-mesh transmissions, with "synchro-mesh" being a further refinement of the constant mesh principle.

In both types, a particular gear combination can only be engaged when the two parts to engage either gears or dog clutches are at the same speed. To shift to a higher gear, the transmission is put in neutral and the engine allowed to slow down until the transmission parts for the next gear are at a proper speed to engage. The vehicle also slows while in neutral and that slows other transmission parts, so the time in neutral depends on the grade, wind, and other such factors. To shift to a lower gear, the transmission is put in neutral and the throttle is used to speed up the engine and thus the relevant transmission parts, to match speeds for engaging the next lower gear. For both upshifts and downshifts, the clutch is released (engaged) while in neutral. Some drivers use the clutch only for starting from a stop, and shifts are done without the clutch. Other drivers will depress (disengage) the clutch, shift to neutral, then engage the clutch momentarily to force transmission parts to match the engine speed, then depress the clutch again to shift to the next gear, a process called double clutching. Double clutching is easier to get smooth, as speeds that are close but not quite matched need to speed up or slow down only transmission parts, whereas with the clutch engaged to the engine, mismatched speeds are fighting the rotational inertia and power of the engine.

Even though automobile and light truck transmissions are now almost universally synchronized, transmissions for heavy trucks and machinery, motorcycles, and for dedicated racing are usually not. Non synchronized transmission designs are used for several reasons. The friction material, such as brass, in synchronizers is more prone to wear and breakage than gears, which are forged steel, and the simplicity of the mechanism improves reliability and reduces cost. In addition, the process of shifting a synchromesh transmission is slower than that of shifting a non-synchromesh transmission. For racing of production-based transmissions, sometimes half the teeth or dogs on the synchros are removed to speed the shifting process, at the expense of greater wear.

Heavy duty trucks often use unsynchronized transmissions. Military trucks usually have synchronized transmissions, allowing untrained personnel to operate them in emergencies. In the United States, traffic safety rules refer to non synchronous transmissions in classes of larger commercial motor vehicles.

Similarly, most modern motorcycles use unsynchronized transmissions as synchronizers are generally not necessary or desirable. Their low gear inertias and higher strengths mean that forcing the gears to alter speed is not damaging, and the pedal operated selector on modern motorcycles is not conducive to having the long shift time of a synchronized gearbox. Because of this, it is necessary to synchronize gear speeds by blipping the throttle when shifting into a lower gear on a motorcycle.

San Antonio Transmission Expert Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop In San Antonio Offers Free Towing w/ Transmission Repairs*, Free Manual Transmission Performance Check, Rebuilt Transmissions, Used Transmissions, New Transmissions, Transmission San Antonio


25.

What Is A Synchronized Transmission?

Most modern cars are fitted with a synchronized gear box. Transmission gears are always in mesh and rotating, but gears on one shaft can freely rotate or be locked to the shaft. The locking mechanism for a gear consists of a collar or dog collar on the shaft which is able to slide sideways so that teeth or dogs on its inner surface bridge two circular rings with teeth on their outer circumference: one attached to the gear, one to the shaft. When the rings are bridged by the collar, that particular gear is rotationally locked to the shaft and determines the output speed of the transmission. The gearshift lever manipulates the collars using a set of linkages, so arranged so that one collar may be permitted to lock only one gear at any one time; when "shifting gears," the locking collar from one gear is disengaged before that of another engaged. One collar often serves for two gears; sliding in one direction selects one transmission speed, in the other direction selects another.

In a synchromesh gearbox, to correctly match the speed of the gear to that of the shaft as the gear is engaged, the collar initially applies a force to a cone-shaped brass clutch attached to the gear, which brings the speeds to match prior to the collar locking into place. The collar is prevented from bridging the locking rings when the speeds are mismatched by synchro rings (also called blocker rings or baulk rings, with the latter being spelt balk in the U.S.). The synchro ring rotates slightly due to the frictional torque from the cone clutch. In this position, the dog clutch is prevented from engaging. The brass clutch ring gradually causes parts to spin at the same speed. When they do spin the same speed, there is no more torque from the cone clutch, and the dog clutch is allowed to fall in to engagement. In a modern gearbox, the action of all of these components is so smooth and fast it is hardly noticed.

The modern cone system was developed by Porsche and introduced in the 1952 Porsche 356 cone synchronisers were called Porsche-type for many years after this. In the early 1950s, only the second-third shift was synchromesh in most cars, requiring only a single synchro and a simple linkage; drivers' manuals in cars suggested that if the driver needed to shift from second to first, it was best to come to a complete stop then shift into first and start up again. With continuing sophistication of mechanical development, however, fully synchromesh transmissions with three speeds, then four speeds, and then five speeds, became universal by the 1980s. Many modern manual transmission cars, especially sports cars, now offer six speeds.

Reverse gear, however, is usually not synchromesh, as there is only one reverse gear in the normal automotive transmission and changing gears into reverse while moving is not required. Among the cars that have synchromesh in reverse are the 1995-2000 Ford Contour and Mercury Mystique, '00-'05 Chevrolet Cavalier, Mercedes 190 2.3-16, the V6 equipped Alfa Romeo GTV / Spider 916, certain Chrysler, Jeep, and GM products which use the New Venture NV3500 and NV3550 units, the European Ford Sierra and Granada / Scorpio equipped with the MT75 gearbox, the Volvo 850, and almost all Lamborghinis and BMW.

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26.

What Are Manual Transmission Gears?

Manual transmissions in passenger vehicles are often equipped with 4, 5, or more recently 6 forward gears in conventional manual transmissions with a gear stick, and up to 8 forward gears in semi-automatic transmissions. Nearly all have one reverse gear. In three or four speed transmissions, in most cases, the topmost gear is direct (i.e., a 1:1 ratio). For five speed or higher transmissions, the highest gear is usually an overdive gear, with a ratio of less than 1:1. Older cars were generally equipped with 3-speed transmissions, or 4-speed transmissions for high performance models and 5-speeds for the most sophisticated of automobiles; in the 1970s, 5-speed transmissions began to appear in low priced mass market automobiles and even compact pickup trucks, pioneered by Toyota. Today, mass market automotive manual transmissions are essentially all 5-speeds, with 6-speed transmissions beginning to emerge in high performance vehicles in the early 1990s, and recently beginning to be offered on some high-efficiency and conventional passenger cars. Some 7-speed manual-derived transmissions are offered on high-end performance cars, such as the Bugatti Veyron 16.4, or the BMW M5. Both of these cars feature a paddle shifter. Recently, even 8-speed transmissions were being offered, such as in the Lexus IS.

On earlier models with three or four forward speeds, the lack of an overdrive ratio for relaxed and fuel-efficient highway cruising was often filled by incorporating a separate overdrive unit in the rear housing of the transmission. This unit was separately actuated by a knob or button, often incorporated into the gearshift knob.

The previous discussion normally applies only to the forward gears. The implementation of the reverse gear is usually different, implemented in the following way to reduce the cost of the transmission. Reverse is also a pair of gears: one gear on the countershaft and one on the output shaft. However, whereas all the forward gears are always meshed together, there is a gap between the reverse gears. Moreover, they are both attached to their shafts: neither one rotates freely about the shaft. What happens when reverse is selected is that a small gear, called an idler gear or reverse idler, is slid between them. The idler has teeth which mesh with both gears, and thus it couples these gears together and reverses the direction of rotation without changing the gear ratio.

In other words, when reverse gear is selected, it is in fact actual gear teeth that are being meshed, with no aid from a synchronization mechanism. For this reason, the output shaft must not be rotating when reverse is selected: the car must be stopped. In order that reverse can be selected without grinding even if the input shaft is spinning inertially, there may be a mechanism to stop the input shaft from spinning. The driver brings the vehicle to a stop, and selects reverse. As that selection is made, some mechanism in the transmission stops the input shaft. Both gears are stopped and the idler can be inserted between them.

Whenever the clutch pedal is depressed to shift into reverse, the mainshaft continues to rotate because of its inertia. The resulting speed difference between mainshaft and reverse idler gear produces gear grinding noise. The reverse gear noise reduction system employs a cam plate which was added to the reverse shift holder. When shifting into reverse, the 5th/reverse shift piece, connected to the shift lever, rotates the cam plate. This causes the 5th synchro set to stop the rotating mainshaft.

A reverse gear implemented this way makes a loud whining sound, which is not normally heard in the forward gears. The teeth on the forward gears of most consumer automobiles are helically cut. When helical gears rotate, there is constant contact between gears, which results in quiet operation. In spite of all forward gears being always meshed, they do not make a sound that can be easily heard above the engine noise. By contrast, most reverse gears are spur gears, meaning that they have straight teeth, in order to allow for the sliding engagement of the idler, which is difficult with helical gears. The teeth of spur gears clatter together when the gears spin, generating a characteristic whine.

It is clear that the spur gear design of reverse gear represents some compromises (less robust, unsynchronized engagement and loud noise) which are acceptable due to the relatively small amount of driving that takes place in reverse. The gearbox of the classic SAAB 900 is a notable example of a gearbox with a helical reverse gear engaged in the same unsynchronized manner as the spur gears described above. Its strange design allows reverse to share cogs with first gear, and is exceptionally quiet, but results in difficult engagement and unreliable operation. However, many modern transmissions now include a reverse gear synchronizer and helical gearing.

When it comes to automotive repair, clutch repair and transmission repair San Antonio drivers turn to Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop “The Transmission Specialist” with confidence. Sergeant Clutch Discount Transmission Repair Shop in San Antonio is ready to serve drivers with transmission problems, clutch problems and automotive problems.

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27.

What Parts Are Inside A Manual Transmission?

Manual Transmission Shafts: Like other transmissions, a manual transmission has several shafts with various gears and other components attached to them. Typically, a rear-wheel-drive transmission has three shafts: an input shaft, a countershaft and an output shaft. The countershaft is sometimes called a layshaft.

In a rear-wheel-drive transmission, the input and output shaft lie along the same line, and may in fact be combined into a single shaft within the transmission. This single shaft is called a mainshaft. The input and output ends of this combined shaft rotate independently, at different speeds, which is possible because one piece slides into a hollow bore in the other piece, where it is supported by a bearing. Sometimes the term mainshaft refers to just the input shaft or just the output shaft, rather than the entire assembly.

In some transmissions, it's possible for the input and output components of the mainshaft to be locked together to create a 1:1 gear ratio, causing the power flow to bypass the countershaft. The mainshaft then behaves like a single, solid shaft, a situation referred to as direct drive.

Even in transmissions that do not feature direct drive, it's an advantage for the input and output to lie along the same line, because this reduces the amount of torsion that the transmission case has to bear.

Under one possible design, the transmission's input shaft has just one pinion gear, which drives the countershaft. Along the countershaft are mounted gears of various sizes, which rotate when the input shaft rotates. These gears correspond to the forward speeds and reverse. Each of the forward gears on the countershaft is permanently meshed with a corresponding gear on the output shaft. However, these driven gears are not rigidly attached to the output shaft: although the shaft runs through them, they spin independently of it, which is made possible by bearings in their hubs. Reverse is typically implemented differently.

Most front-wheel-drive transmissions for transverse engine mounting are designed differently. For one thing, they have an integral final drive and differential. For another, they usually have only two shafts; input and countershaft, sometimes called input and output. The input shaft runs the whole length of the gearbox, and there is no separate input pinion. At the end of the second (counter/output) shaft is a pinion gear that mates with the ring gear on the differential.

Front-wheel and rear-wheel-drive transmissions operate similarly. When the transmission is in neutral, and the clutch is disengaged, the input shaft, clutch disk and countershaft can continue to rotate under their own inertia. In this state, the engine, the input shaft and clutch, and the output shaft all rotate independently.

Dog clutch: Among many different types of clutches, a dog clutch provides non-slip coupling of two rotating members. It is not at all suited to intentional slipping, in contrast with the foot-operated friction clutch of a manual transmission car.

The transmission gear selector does not engage or disengage the actual gear teeth which are permanently meshed. Rather, the action of the gear selector is to lock one of the freely spinning gears to the shaft that runs through its hub. The shaft then spins together with that gear. The output shaft's speed relative to the countershaft is determined by the ratio of the two gears: the one permanently attached to the countershaft, and that gear's mate which is now locked to the output shaft.

Locking the output shaft with a gear is achieved by means of a dog clutch selector. The dog clutch is a sliding selector mechanism which is splined to the output shaft, meaning that its hub has teeth that fit into slots (splines) on the shaft, forcing that shaft to rotate with it. However, the splines allow the selector to move back and forth on the shaft, which happens when it is pushed by a selector fork that is linked to the gear lever. The fork does not rotate, so it is attached to a collar bearing on the selector. The selector is typically symmetric: it slides between two gears and has a synchromesh and teeth on each side in order to lock either gear to the shaft.

Synchromesh: If the teeth, the so-called dog teeth, make contact with the gear, but the two parts are spinning at different speeds, the teeth will fail to engage and a loud grinding sound will be heard as they clatter together. For this reason, a modern dog clutch in an automobile has a synchronizer mechanism or synchromesh, which consists of a cone clutch and blocking ring. Before the teeth can engage, the cone clutch engages first which brings the selector and gear to the same speed using friction. Moreover, until synchronization occurs, the teeth are prevented from making contact, because further motion of the selector is prevented by a blocker ring. When synchronization occurs, friction on the blocker ring is relieved and it twists slightly, bringing into alignment certain grooves and notches that allow further passage of the selector which brings the teeth together. Of course, the exact design of the synchronizer varies from manufacturer to manufacturer.

The synchronizer has to change the momentum of the entire input shaft and clutch disk. Additionally, it can be abused by exposure to the momentum and power of the engine itself, which is what happens when attempts are made to select a gear without fully disengaging the clutch. This causes extra wear on the rings and sleeves, reducing their service life. When an experimenting driver tries to "match the revs" on a synchronized transmission and force it into gear without using the clutch, the synchronizer will make up for any discrepancy in RPM. The success in engaging the gear without clutching can deceive the driver into thinking that the RPM of the layshaft and transmission were actually exactly matched. Nevertheless, approximate rev. matching with clutching can decrease the general delta between layshaft and transmission and decrease synchro wear.

Reverse: The previous discussion normally applies only to the forward gears. The implementation of the reverse gear is usually different, implemented in the following way to reduce the cost of the transmission. Reverse is also a pair of gears: one gear on the countershaft and one on the output shaft. However, whereas all the forward gears are always meshed together, there is a gap between the reverse gears. Moreover, they are both attached to their shafts: neither one rotates freely about the shaft. What happens when reverse is selected is that a small gear, called an idler gear or reverse idler, is slid between them. The idler has teeth which mesh with both gears, and thus it couples these gears together and reverses the direction of rotation without changing the gear ratio.

In other words, when reverse gear is selected, it is in fact actual gear teeth that are being meshed, with no aid from a synchronization mechanism. For this reason, the output shaft must not be rotating when reverse is selected: the car must be stopped. In order that reverse can be selected without grinding even if the input shaft is spinning inertially, there may be a mechanism to stop the input shaft from spinning. The driver brings the vehicle to a stop, and selects reverse. As that selection is made, some mechanism in the transmission stops the input shaft. Both gears are stopped and the idler can be inserted between them.

Whenever the clutch pedal is depressed to shift into reverse, the mainshaft continues to rotate because of its inertia. The resulting speed difference between mainshaft and reverse idler gear produces gear grinding noise. The reverse gear noise reduction system employs a cam plate which was added to the reverse shift holder. When shifting into reverse, the 5th/reverse shift piece, connected to the shift lever, rotates the cam plate. This causes the 5th synchro set to stop the rotating mainshaft.

A reverse gear implemented this way makes a loud whining sound, which is not normally heard in the forward gears. The teeth on the forward gears of most consumer automobiles are helically cut. When helical gears rotate, there is constant contact between gears, which results in quiet operation. In spite of all forward gears being always meshed, they do not make a sound that can be easily heard above the engine noise. By contrast, most reverse gears are spur gears, meaning that they have straight teeth, in order to allow for the sliding engagement of the idler, which is difficult with helical gears. The teeth of spur gears clatter together when the gears spin, generating a characteristic whine.

It is clear that the spur gear design of reverse gear represents some compromises (less robust, unsynchronized engagement and loud noise) which are acceptable due to the relatively small amount of driving that takes place in reverse. The gearbox of the classic SAAB 900 is a notable example of a gearbox with a helical reverse gear engaged in the same unsynchronized manner as the spur gears described above. Its strange design allows reverse to share cogs with first gear, and is exceptionally quiet, but results in difficult engagement and unreliable operation. However, many modern transmissions now include a reverse gear synchronizer and helical gearing.

Manual transmissions in passenger vehicles are often equipped with 4, 5, or more recently 6 forward gears in conventional manual transmissions with a gear stick, and up to 8 forward gears in semi-automatic transmissions. Nearly all have one reverse gear. In three or four speed transmissions, in most cases, the topmost gear is direct (i.e., a 1:1 ratio). For five speed or higher transmissions, the highest gear is usually an overdive gear, with a ratio of less than 1:1. Older cars were generally equipped with 3-speed transmissions, or 4-speed transmissions for high performance models and 5-speeds for the most sophisticated of automobiles; in the 1970s, 5-speed transmissions began to appear in low priced mass market automobiles and even compact pickup trucks, pioneered by Toyota. Today, mass market automotive manual transmissions are essentially all 5-speeds, with 6-speed transmissions beginning to emerge in high performance vehicles in the early 1990s, and recently beginning to be offered on some high-efficiency and conventional passenger cars. Some 7-speed manual-derived transmissions are offered on high-end performance cars, such as the Bugatti Veyron 16.4, or the BMW M5. Both of these cars feature a paddle shifter. Recently, even 8-speed transmissions were being offered, such as in the Lexus IS F.

On earlier models with three or four forward speeds, the lack of an overdrive ratio for relaxed and fuel-efficient highway cruising was often filled by incorporating a separate overdrive unit in the rear housing of the transmission. This unit was separately actuated by a knob or button, often incorporated into the gearshift knob.

On a conventional rear-drive transmission, there are three basic shafts; the input, the output, and the countershaft. The input and output together are called the mainshaft, since they are joined inside the transmission so they appear to be a single shaft, although they rotate totally independently of each other. The input length of this shaft is much shorter than the output shaft. Parallel to the mainshaft is the countershaft. There are a number of gears fixed along the countershaft, and matching gears along the output shaft, although these are not fixed, and rotate independently of the output shaft. There are sliding dog collars, or dog clutches, between the gears on the output shaft, and to engage a gear to the shaft, the collar slides into the space between the shaft and the inside space of the gear, thus rotating the shaft as well. One collar is usually mounted between two gears, and slides both ways to engage one or the other gears, so on a four speed there would be two collars. A front-drive transmission is basically the same, but may be simplified. There often are two shafts, the input and the output, but depending on the direction of rotation of the engine, three may be required. Rather that input shaft driving the countershaft with a pinion gear, the input shaft takes over the countershafts job, and the output shaft runs parallel to it. The gears are positioned and engaged just as they are on the countershaft-output shaft on a rear-drive. This merely eliminates one major component, the pinion gear. Part of the reason that the input and output are in-line on a rear drive unit is to relieve torsion stress on the transmission and mountings, but this isn't an issue in a front-drive as the gearbox is integrated into the transaxle.

The basic process is not universal. The fixed and free gears can be mounted on either the input or output shaft, or both.

The distribution of the shifters is also a matter of design; it need not be the case that all of the free-rotating gears with selectors are on one shaft, and the permanently splined gears on the other. For instance a five speed transmission might have the first-to-second selectors on the countershaft, but the third-to-fourth selector and the fifth selector on the mainshaft, which is the configuration in the 1998 Honda Civic. This means that when the car is stopped and idling in neutral with the clutch engaged input shaft spinning, the third, fourth and fifth gear pairs do not rotate.

In some transmission designs (Volvo 850 and V/S70 series, for example) there are actually two countershafts, both driving an output pinion meshing with the front-wheel-drive transaxle's ring gear. This allows the transmission designer to make the transmission narrower, since each countershaft need only be half as long as a traditional countershaft with four gears and two shifters.

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28.

What Is Synchromesh?

If the teeth, the so-called dog teeth, make contact with the gear, but the two parts are spinning at different speeds, the teeth will fail to engage and a loud grinding sound will be heard as they clatter together. For this reason, a modern dog clutch in an automobile has a synchronizer mechanism or synchromesh, which consists of a cone clutch and blocking ring. Before the teeth can engage, the cone clutch engages first which brings the selector and gear to the same speed using friction. Moreover, until synchronization occurs, the teeth are prevented from making contact, because further motion of the selector is prevented by a blocker ring. When synchronization occurs, friction on the blocker ring is relieved and it twists slightly, bringing into alignment certain grooves and notches that allow further passage of the selector which brings the teeth together. Of course, the exact design of the synchronizer varies from manufacturer to manufacturer.

The synchronizer has to change the momentum of the entire input shaft and clutch disk. Additionally, it can be abused by exposure to the momentum and power of the engine itself, which is what happens when attempts are made to select a gear without fully disengaging the clutch. This causes extra wear on the rings and sleeves, reducing their service life. When an experimenting driver tries to "match the revs" on a synchronized transmission and force it into gear without using the clutch, the synchronizer will make up for any discrepancy in RPM. The success in engaging the gear without clutching can deceive the driver into thinking that the RPM of the layshaft and transmission were actually exactly matched. Nevertheless, approximate rev. matching with clutching can decrease the general delta between layshaft and transmission and decrease synchro wear.

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29.

What Is A Dog Clutch?

Among many different types of clutches, a dog clutch provides non-slip coupling of two rotating members. It is not at all suited to intentional slipping, in contrast with the foot-operated friction clutch of a manual transmission car.

The transmission gear selector does not engage or disengage the actual gear teeth which are permanently meshed. Rather, the action of the gear selector is to lock one of the freely spinning gears to the shaft that runs through its hub. The shaft then spins together with that gear. The output shaft's speed relative to the countershaft is determined by the ratio of the two gears: the one permanently attached to the countershaft, and that gear's mate which is now locked to the output shaft.

Locking the output shaft with a gear is achieved by means of a dog clutch selector. The dog clutch is a sliding selector mechanism which is splined to the output shaft, meaning that its hub has teeth that fit into slots (splines) on the shaft, forcing that shaft to rotate with it. However, the splines allow the selector to move back and forth on the shaft, which happens when it is pushed by a selector fork that is linked to the gear lever. The fork does not rotate, so it is attached to a collar bearing on the selector. The selector is typically symmetric: it slides between two gears and has a synchromesh and teeth on each side in order to lock either gear to the shaft.

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30.

What Are The Benefits Of A Manual Transmission?

Manual transmissions generally offer better fuel economy than automatic torque converter transmissions; however the disparity has been somewhat offset with the introduction of locking torque converters on automatic transmissions. Increased fuel economy with a properly operated manual transmission vehicle versus an equivalent automatic transmission vehicle can range from 5% to about 15% depending on driving conditions and style of driving. Manual transmissions do not require active cooling and generally weigh less than comparable automatics. The manual transmission couples the engine to the transmission with a rigid clutch instead of a torque converter which slips by nature. Manual transmissions also lack the parasitic power consumption of the automatic transmission's hydraulic pump. Additionally, they require less maintenance and are easier to repair due to the fact that they have fewer moving parts and are, mechanically, much simpler than automatic transmissions. When properly operated by an experienced driver, manual transmissions also tend to last longer than automatic transmissions.

Manual transmissions also generally offer a higher selection of gear ratios. Many vehicles offer a 5-speed or 6-speed manual, whereas the automatic option would typically be a 4-speed. The higher selection of gears allowed for more uses of the engine's power band, allowing for higher fuel economy and power output. This is generally due to the space available inside of a manual transmission versus an automatic since the latter requires extra components for self-shifting, such as torque converters and pumps. Automatic transmissions are now adding more speeds as the technology matures. ZF currently makes an 8-Speed automatic transmission, which is used on the Rolls Royce Ghost and the Bentley Mulsanne. The automatic transmission in the Nissan 370Z also has 7 speeds.

Manual transmissions are more efficient than conventional automatics and belt-driven continuously-variable transmissions. The driver has more direct control over the car with a manual than with an automatic, which can be employed by an experienced, knowledgeable driver who knows the correct procedure for executing a driving maneuver, and wants the vehicle to realize his or her intentions exactly and instantly. When starting forward, for example, the driver can control how much torque goes to the tires, which is useful on slippery surfaces such as ice, snow or mud. This can be done with clutch finesse, or by starting in second gear instead of first. An engine coupled with a manual transmission can often be started by the method of push starting. This is particularly useful if the starter is inoperable or defunct or the battery has drained below operable voltage. Likewise, a vehicle with a manual transmission and no clutch/starter interlock switch can be moved, if necessary, by cranking the starter while in gear. This is useful when the vehicle will not start, but must be immediately moved e.g. off the road in the event of a breakdown, if the vehicle has stalled on a railway crossing, or in extreme off-roading cases such as an engine that has stalled in deep water.

Currently only fully manual transmissions allow the driver to fully exploit the engine power at low to medium engine speeds. This is due to the fact that even automatic transmissions which provide some manual mode (e.g. tiptronic or DSG), use a throttle kickdown switch, which forces a downshift on full throttle and causes the gearbox to ignore a user command to upshift on full throttle. This is especially notable on uphill roads, where cars with automatic transmission need to slow down to avoid downshifts, whereas cars with manual transmission and identical or lower engine power are still able to maintain their speed.

In contrast to most manual gearboxes, most automatic transmissions have a free-wheel-clutch. This means that the engine does not slow down the car when the driver steps off the throttle, also known as engine braking. This leads to more usage of the brakes in cars with automatic transmissions. (the commodity Nissan's or Honda's automatic gearboxes disables the free wheel operation completely if the driver has selected a gear position other than "D" - either "1", "2", or "D with overdrive off". This works by blocking the free-wheel sprag using a multi-disk clutch called the "overrun clutch")

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31.

What Are The Drawbacks Of A Manual Transmission?

The smoothness and correct timing of gear shifts are wholly dependent on the driver's experience and skill. If an inexperienced driver selects the wrong gear by mistake, she/he can do damage to the engine or transmission.

Attempting to select reverse while the vehicle is moving forward causes severe gear wear except in transmissions with synchromesh on the reverse gear. Most manual transmissions have a gate that locks out reverse directly from 5th gear however, to help prevent this. In order to engage reverse from 5th, the shift lever has to be moved to the center position between 2nd and 3rd, then back over and into reverse. Many newer six-speed manual transmissions have a collar under the shift knob which must be lifted to engage reverse to also help prevent this.

Choosing too low of a gear with the car moving at speed can over-rev and damage the engine. There is a learning curve with a manual transmission; the driver must develop a feel for properly engaging the clutch, especially when starting forward on a steep road or when parking on an incline.

Some automatic transmissions can shift ratios faster than a manual gear change can be accomplished, due to the time required for the average driver to push the clutch pedal to the floor and move the gearstick from one position to another. This is especially true in regards to dual clutch transmissions, which are specialized computer-controlled manual transmissions. Even though some automatic transmissions and semi-automatic transmissions can shift faster, many purists still prefer a regular manual transmission.

Manual transmissions place a slightly greater workload on the driver in heavy traffic situations, when the driver must often operate the clutch pedal. In comparison, automatic transmissions merely require moving the foot from the accelerator pedal to the brake pedal, and vice versa. Manual transmissions require the driver to remove one hand periodically from the steering wheel while the vehicle is in motion.


32.

Which Transmission Is More Energy Efficient An Automatic Or Manual?

Hydraulic automatic transmissions are almost always less energy efficient than manual transmissions due mainly to viscous and pumping losses; both in the torque converter and the hydraulic actuators. A relatively small amount of energy is required to pressurize the hydraulic control system, which uses fluid pressure to determine the correct shifting patterns and operate the various automatic clutch mechanisms.

Manual transmissions use a mechanical clutch to transmit torque, rather than a torque converter, thus avoiding the primary source of loss in an automatic transmission. Manual transmissions also avoid the power requirement of the hydraulic control system, by relying on the human muscle power of the vehicle operator to disengage the clutch and actuate the gear levers, and the mental power of the operator to make appropriate gear ratio selections. Thus the manual transmission requires very little engine power to function, with the main power consumption due to drag from the gear train being immersed in the lubricating oil of the gearbox.

The energy efficiency of automatic transmission has increased with the introduction of the torque converter lock-up clutch, which practically eliminates fluid losses when engaged. Modern automatic transmission also minimize energy usage and complexity, by minimizing the amount of shifting logic that is done hydraulically. Typically, control of the transmission has been transferred to computerized control systems which do not use fluid pressure for shift logic or actuation of clutching mechanisms.

The on road acceleration of an automatic transmission can occasionally exceed that of an otherwise identical vehicle equipped with a manual transmission in turbocharged diesel applications. Turbo-boost is normally lost between gear changes in a manual whereas in an automatic the accelerator pedal can remain fully depressed. This however is still largely dependent upon the number and optimal spacing of gear ratios for each unit, and whether or not the elimination of spool down / accelerator lift off represent a significant enough gain to counter the slightly higher power consumption of the automatic transmission itself.

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33.

Used Junkyard Transmission Replacement Versus Rebuilt Transmission Replacement

Why pay $ 400.00 to over $1,000.00 for a used junkyard manual transmission replacement? When in most cases for a few hundred dollars more, you could repair transmission, rebuild transmission, remanufactured transmission or even buy a new transmission.

Many times drivers overlook the fine print details involved with buying a used manual transmission from a junkyard or salvage yard. Many times the junkyard or salvage yard has no clue as to the history of the automobile they part out. They may know the mileage but they do not know if the manual transmission is original or has the transmission fluid been changed. Many times manual transmissions found at junkyards or salvage yards have been involved in an accident or fire. Most junkyards or salvage yards store used manual transmissions outside and are exposed to water and the elements. Once water contaminates an manual transmission it is damaged and will not operate properly. Water damages the transmission clutch lining material on the clutches inside many manual transmissions are contaminated; many junkyards or salvage yards rate a transmission by the condition of the transmission fluid. By just checking, the manual transmission fluid does not properly evaluate the internal manual transmission parts. Water also rust forms on the internal transmission metal parts and bearings. Heat damages the transmission seals both external and internal. Most junkyards or salvage yards sale transmissions with no warranty, as is, some offer 30 day guarantee on parts only no labor. Some high tech junkyards or salvage yards sale manual transmissions with extended warranty for a premium up charge. Remember just because the junkyard or salvage sales you a better guarantee on the transmission it does not mean the transmission is any better. It just means if the first transmission they sold you does not work they will simply give you another junkyard transmission and hope that transmission out last the extended the warranty they sold you. What happens if the used manual transmission from the junkyard goes bad under the warranty? You will have to remove the transmission from the automobile and return it to the junkyard or salvage yard. What happens if the junkyard does not have another transmission like the one you need in stock? You wait for them to get another transmission. Most junkyards or salvage yards will not refund any money. There many complications in dealing with used transmissions such as correct type but wrong model. Many times transmissions have one or two things different from bolt hole in the wrong spot to electrical connector in the wrong place. Many customers that compare rebuilt transmission prices vs. used transmission prices lose sight of a few things. At first, the used transmission price may seem cost efficient verses rebuilt transmission price. Here is an example of the correct way to calculate the cost of a used junkyard transmission replacement.

Cost of used transmission(just for example purpose only) $800.00

Cost of extended warranty coverage for used manual transmission. That is if the junkyard or salvage yard offers a warranty. (Average) $85.00

Cost of labor to remove and replace transmission. (Average) $600.00

Cost of new transmission fluid. (Average 6 qts) $35.00

Cost of recommended transmission parts to ensure warranty if warranty applies. A used transmission should have at least the front transmission seal replaced, rear transmission seal, transmission axle seals, (Average cost with labor) $60.00

Cost of transmission diagnostic test and relearn process. Most transmission have sensors, solenoids and computers that must be reset and reprogrammed after a transmission replacement or transmission repair. (Average Cost) $75.00

Cost of tow truck service to auto repair shop or mechanics house. (Average Cost) $75.00

Now let us add up the average total for a used junkyard or salvage yard transmission.

$800.00

$50.00

$600.00

$35.00

$15.00

$80.00

$75.00

$75.00

TOTAL = $1,730.00

This average cost of a used transmission replacement still has many other possible hidden costs involved. If the used transmission does not work properly the first time or anytime after you will have to pay for the labor again to remove and replace the transmission. You will have to pay for labor again to remove the transmission since the mechanic or auto repair shop will not give you a warranty for labor on a used transmission. Therefore, the labor would be an additional $600.00 on average. In addition, new transmission fluid as the transmission fluid first used may be contaminated now. In addition. In addition, the cost of new front transmission seal replaced, rear transmission seal, transmission axle seals, (Average cost with labor) $60.00. In addition, towing service if your transmission goes out on you and leaves you stranded average cost $75.00. Not to mention all the time involved in this process. All the missed appointments and inconveniences. In addition, you do not really know when or where that used transmission may go out. So lets add up the original average cost of a used manual transmission replacement $1,730.00 plus the cost of a possible transmission problem occurring with the used transmission replacement.

$1,730.00 Average cost of used junkyard / salvage yard transmission replacement

$845.00 Average cost of replacing used transmission after first installation.

Total $2,575.00 not to mention the cost of another used junkyard transmission if the original used transmission you purchased has No Warranty. Then you have to buy another transmission. Let us just say worst-case scenario it happens. You buy another used transmission for $800.00 average. Now add the second transmission replacement to the $2,575.00 now the total of the used junkyard / salvage transmission replacement cost you $3,375.00. I know it sounds extreme and a little crazy how a used transmission replacement ended up costing over $3,000.00 still with no really assurance that the transmission will not break down again.

Some customers get sticker shock when first hearing the cost of repair transmission or rebuilt transmission. However, the cost of a rebuilt manual transmission includes many benefits over the used junkyard transmission replacement. Such as free towing to the auto shop, complete computer diagnostics, complete transmission overhaul including all new transmission parts such as new transmission seals, new transmission gaskets, etc. In addition, a rebuilt transmission repair service includes a transmission warranty for parts and labor for 1 year / 12,000 miles up to 3 year / 50,000 miles. Now that’s piece of mind knowing your transmission that belongs in your car or truck has been completely dismantled , inspected , cleaned, all worn and damaged transmission parts have been replaced and backed by a transmission parts and labor warranty. The average cost of a basic automatic transmission overhaul is $885.00 parts and labor. The cost of a major transmission rebuild is $1,500.00 to $2,200.00 parts and labor. The cost of a manual transmission repair service always depends on what transmission parts are bad, broken, worn or recommended. Isn’t it better to spend a little more the first time a get the repair job done right, instead of a lot more later?

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